The Metaverse, Narrative, and Breadcrumbs

Most posts here are likely to center around particular aspects of content creation in the virtual world. Categories used for this blog are listed in the navigation column ( —> ).  Some names will be quite specific (“media cafe”) or explain themselves (“design”); but, several category names are broad, or generic.

The category “Metaverse” labels posts focused on experiences with the virtual worlds of SecondLife™ or OpenSimulator. “Narrative” indicates  random, fringe topics, often describing a sequence of events; typically fraught with opinion.

Today, I have created another generic category: Breadcrumbs. To explain…

My first exposure to the Internet was on my high school’s huge teletype machine housed in a re-purposed maintenance storage room (read: closet). Our computer class even had a weblog; not talking blogs here, but old-school weblogs…a file stored remotely (in the cloud!) and used to store Internet service provider addresses. It was a record of where you had been, so you could find your way back again.

Digital breadcrumbs.

image of two dimensional diagram, lines forming a maze
The sort of maze we created using BASIC on the ‘puter in high school.

I remember that all very clearly; dialing up and connecting, hunting and pecking at dead-end after dead-end, and finally discovering information that got sucked through wires from hundreds of miles away to be painted with light on the monochrome monitor in front of us.

Magical.

However, at fourteen years of age, I think I was more impressed watching custom generated mazes spool from the printer on six-foot-long perforated pages.

My first WWW presence was with Yahoo! Geocities, a host that has long since withered. We can still get a peek at much of the space, thanks to the The Wayback Machine, and see instructional Web 1.0 content like this and like this.

My first “blog” also became a link repository, effectively. I started that to share with my two sons from a distance, having gone off to grad school. It quickly became a record of my own web tracks…old school style. I do not actually remember—but, can easily imagine—my youngest son raising one eyebrow at the title, as mentioned in the second post there.

I still wrote for the boys, but often took to logging footprints; a habit that I will occasionally revert into…posting a link-fest like this one.

Thirty-five years or more, and I am still dropping breadcrumbs.